Friday, November 3, 2017

Vacuum Ovens

vacuum oven
Vacuum oven chamber is upper portion, with controls
on top and vacuum station below.
Image courtesy BMT USA
Drying, the removal of moisture or a solvent from a solid material, is a common process throughout research and production operations. The myriad applications each have the same purpose, but may need to employ differing means to accomplish their goal.

There are some instances where a combination of heat and reduced pressure can produce the best results. A vacuum oven enables the reduction of the atmospheric pressure within the enclosed chamber, while at the same time applying heat to the subject material. Reduced pressure lowers the temperature at which a liquid will vaporize. Heat provides energy needed for the vaporization of water or solvents contained with the subject material. Chamber pressure reduction is accomplished with a vacuum pump that is equipped or otherwise suitable for use with whatever vapors may emanate from the chamber. In some cases, the removal of air from the chamber is also beneficial because it inhibits oxidation of the drying material during the drying process.

A well configured vacuum oven will have easy to use controls for temperature and vacuum system operation. The manner in which the chamber interior is configured to enhance conduction of heat into the processed material is also important. Vacuum systems can be separate, or integrated as part of a complete vacuum oven system.

For more information, share your drying application challenges with laboratory equipment specialists, leveraging your own knowledge and experience with their product application expertise to develop an effective solution.


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